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Completed Research Projects

Research Project -1

Title of Project

Promotion of Environment Friendly Plasma Nitriding Process for Surface Hardening of Industrial Components (Ref. No. ST(RJ)/DP/2K6/445)

Sponsored by

 Department of Science and Technology, Rajasthan and National Engineering Industries, Jaipur

Duration

 3½ years (March 2007- September 2010)

Specific Area

 Industrial Plasma Technology

Project Cost

 68.6 Lac

Principal Investigator

 Dr. Ram Prakash, BIT Mesra, Jaipur Campus

Co-Investigators

 1. Prof. P.K. Barhai, BIT,Mesra

 2. Dr. S. Mukherjee, FCIPT, IPR, Gandhinagar

 3. Mrs. Alphonsa Joseph, FCIPT, IPR, Gandhinagar

Objectives of Project

  1. To promote and demonstrate environmentally clean technology of surface hardening in Rajasthan state.

  2. To make the local industry aware of this technology and educate them so that they can transit to this clean technology.

  3. Making indigenously produced plasma-nitrided products /components competitive in the international market.

Features of Plasma  Nitriding Process

 Plasma nitriding is a surface-hardening heat treatment that introduces nitrogen into the surface of steel at a temperature range of 500-570oC. This technology is useful in industrial sectors like automobile, railways, bearings, textiles, tool & die, hydro & thermal power, aerospace and defense etc.

In vacuum, high voltage electrical energy is used to form plasma.  Nitrogen ions are accelerated in the plasma and impinge on the work piece to form iron-nitride compounds. Such compounds then diffuse into the sample surface to harden it. This plasma process is found superior than other nitriding processes due to following reasons:

  1. Environment friendly.
  2. Higher treated layer thickness in reduced time.
  3. Improved layer thickness uniformity.
  4. Applicable to all types of steels.
  5. No post grinding is required.
  6. Wide range of operating temperatures.
  7. Cost-effective performance.

Plasma Nitriding System at BIT,

 

  1. Large cylindrical vacuum chamber.
  2.  Arrangements for vacuum and heating.
  3. 25 KW pulsed DC Power at 15-30 kHz frequency.
  4. Material capacity of 400 Kg at a time.
  5. Computerized PLC based system operation/monitoring.

 

Research Project -2

Title of Project

 Computational Quantitative Plasma Spectroscopy for Tokamak Plasmas  (Ref. No. NFP/DIAG/2)

Sponsored by

BRFST (National Fusion Program)

 Duration

 2 years (August 2007- November 2009)

Specific Area

 Computation and simulation

Project Cost

22.8 Lac

Principal Investigator

Dr. Ram Prakash, BIT Mesra, Jaipur Campus

Co-Investigators

1. Dr. P. Vasu, IPR, Gandhinagar

2. Dr. Vinay Kumar, IPR, Gandhinagar

Objectives of Project

 1. To ensure a reliable source of plasma characterization from existing spectrometers and suet of spectroscopic codes, parametric studies and impurity transport modeling to understand and improve existing knowledge in fusion plasma spectroscopy.

 2. To utilize advanced spectroscopic tools like - ADAS and STRAHL codes for analysis and interpretation of the experimentally derived spectroscopic data from the ADITYA tokamak and other laboratory plasma devices.

 3. To extend the work for the spectroscopic data from the upcoming SST-1 tokamak.

Plasma spectroscopy

In the fusion plasma, emitted radiations contain relevant information on the nature of the plasma and can be used to understand the plasma environment by spectroscopic methods. The optical spectrum recorded of the observed radiation is rich in information content because it is a combination of effects of electron plasma density Ne, electron temperature Te, ion temperature Ti, plasma motion and concentration of different species etc. However, interpreting it to bring out these effects for the diagnostics of the plasma is a formidable task.

Directly inferring the plasma parameters like electron plasma density Ne and temperature Te from the measured intensities of the lines is, in general, not possible. But in reverse, i.e. calculation of population density of excited state and hence the intensity of line, is possible when the plasma conditions are well specified.  Generally, Collisional-Radiative (C-R) based spectroscopic models and computational codes are utilized to get plasma parameters in plasma spectroscopy.

Computational code used in the project

The Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) is an interconnected set of computer codes (which includes the CR model as well) and database for modeling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasma. It covers most type of the atomic processes and the data required for fusion and laboratory plasma applications. This particular code runs on IDL (Interactive Data Language) platform for easy accessibility of database and graphical display.

 

Ongoing Research Projects

Title of Project

Studies of High Z impurity behavior using VUV spectral emissions from the tokamaks in IPR (Ref. No. 39/14/28/2016-BRNS)

Sponsored by

BRNS, DAE

 Duration

 2 years (April 2017- March 2019)

Specific Area

 Computation simulation, Experiment

Project Cost

 20.3 Lac

Principal Investigator

 Dr. Anand Kumar Srivastava, BIT Mesra, Jaipur Campus

Co-Investigators

1. Dr. Malay B. Chowdhuri, IPR, Gandhinagar

2. Mrs. Ranjana Manchanda, IPR, Gandhinagar

Objectives of Project

Study of the high Z impurity transport in Aditya and Aditya Upgrade tokamak using VUV spectroscopy system coupled to these tokamaks during various experiments like auxillary heating, Ne gas puffing, etc. This is involved the following;

  1. Generation of photon emissivity coefficient (PEC) using fundamental atomic data from ADAS (Atomic Data and Analysis Structure) database through the development of user programs using IDL or MATLAB software.
  2. Data analysis of VUV spectrum acquired from Aditya tokamak though the Line analysis of spectral emission from high Z impurities to understand their temporal behavior in the tokamak plasma.
  3. Implementation of STRAHL code for preliminarily study of impurity transport to develop its methodology.
  4. Further experiments on Aditya Upgrade tokamak during various experimental campaigns.
  5. Detailed studies of impurity transport process of high Z impurities.

Plasma spectroscopy

 In the fusion plasma, emitted radiations contain relevant information on the nature of the plasma and can be used to understand the plasma environment by spectroscopic methods. The optical spectrum recorded of the observed radiation is rich in information content because it is a combination of effects of electron plasma density Ne, electron temperature Te, ion temperature Ti, plasma motion and concentration of different species etc. However, interpreting it to bring out these effects for the diagnostics of the plasma is a formidable task.

 Directly inferring the plasma parameters like electron plasma density Ne and temperature Te from the measured intensities of the lines is, in general, not possible. But in reverse, i.e. calculation of population density of excited state and hence the intensity of line, is possible when the plasma conditions are well specified.  Generally, Collisional-Radiative (C-R) based spectroscopic models and computational codes are utilized to get plasma parameters in plasma spectroscopy.

Computational code used in the project

 The Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) is an interconnected set of computer codes (which includes the CR model as well) and database for modeling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasma. It covers most type of the atomic processes and the data required for fusion and laboratory plasma applications. This particular code runs on IDL (Interactive Data Language) platform for easy accessibility of database and graphical display.

STRAHL code will be used to study impurity transport in plasma.